Contact

Sales: Rapi Films, Jakarta ([email protected])

Credits

Theatrical release: Indonesia, 23 Sep 2010.

Presented by Rapi Films (ID). Produced by Rapi Films (ID). Executive producers: Sunil Samtani, Sonu S., Sonya V.M., Shalu Mulani. Producers: Gope T. Samtani, Subagio S.

Script: Ery Sofid. Photography: Freddy Adhi, Nayato Fio Nuala. Editing: Tiara Puspa Rani, Agung Bhegenk. Music: Eka Firdaus. Art direction: Koesnadi W.S. Sound: Khikmawan Santosa.

Cast: Zaki Zimah (Zaky, the d.p.), Leylarey Lesesne (Ale, the production manager), Monique Henry (Monique, the director), Sazha Clarissa (Sasa, Rozi's assistant), Rozi Mahally (Rozi, the stylist), Dhana Colle (Dana, the sound recordist), Arumi Bachsin (Arumi), Ismi Melinda (Linda), Intan Maya (Bil, the big-breasted actress), Nabila Putri, Arbain, Ivan, Winda, Franklin Keling.


6

Evil Rises Pocong jumat kliwon

Indonesia
Contemporary comedy horror
2010, colour, 1.85:1, 77 mins

Directed by Nayato Fio Nuala


Evil Rises

By Derek Elley

Thu, 25 August 2011, 12:40 PM (HKT)


Modest but entertaining comedy horror about a young film crew haunted by a ghost. Asian and genre events.

Story

Java, the present day. In the jungle a group of university students are making a low-budget horror film, directed by Monique (Monique Henry) and photographed by Zaky (Zaki Zimah). Lead actress Arumi (Arumi Bachsin) is proving troublesome and has an argument with Linda (Ismi Melinda), who's playing a ghost, when the latter's wig gets in her way. Gay stylist Rozi (Rozi Mahally) and his assistant Sasa (Sazha Clarissa) replace the wig, but in the next take Linda goes crazy and starts attacking Arumi. A pocong (wandering ghost) starts to haunt the crew and Arumi quits. The core team decides to go back to the house it shares in the city but that night the pocong continues to haunt them. Zaki and sound man Dana (Dhana Colle), who share a room, take it in turns to stay on watch, as Zaki especially is freaked out. Next day, Rozi discovers the hair in the replacement wig came from a young woman who was brutally killed by her husband. The group set out to find a shaman and put the pocong to rest.


Review

A comedy horror about a film crew haunted by a pocong (wandering ghost), Evil Rises Pocong jumat kliwon (2010) is good fun within its modest, throwaway limitations. Currently ranked as Indonesia's most prolific film-maker, director/d.p. Nayato Fio NUALA — aka Koya Pagayo, Ian Jacobs, Pingkan Utari and Ciska Doppert — studied film in Taiwan and returned to Indonesia in 1996, and since his first feature, The Soul (2002), has made almost 50 movies, mostly in the past five years. Though his movies embrace almost every genre (First Love, The Butterfly, Virgin 2), Nuala, 43, is best known for his horror movies (Ekskul, The Ghost of Mortuary), with a particular stress on local favourites kuntilanak (female vampires) and pocong.

Back-of-a-coaster plot, by Nuala's regular writer Ery SOFID, starts with the old trick of a scene from the film before segueing to the bickering crew, hauntings by the ghost, and more hauntings when they all go back to the house they share. (An almost identical plot trajectory was used by recent Malaysian docu-horror Resurrection Seru (2011), made just afterwards.) With the actresses at each others' throats, the ghost jumping around in a traditional knotted shroud, a gay stylist throwing hissy fits, and the women constantly taking showers, the accent is firmly tongue-in-cheek, and on that level the film both keeps moving within its tight running time and never pretends to be anything more than it is.

Technically, the production for veteran genre company Rapi Films is okay, with tight editing, good location work around Bogor, south of Jakarta, and effective use of narrow-depth-of-field. Performances by the young cast are also okay in a pulpy way, especially Zaki ZIMAH as the nervous d.p., Monique HENRY as the tough director and newcomer Sazha Clarissa as the stylist's assistant. Model-actress Arumi BACHSIN pops up at the start as the film-with-the-film's high-maintenance star.

The film's original title — which roughly means Friday Ghost — recalls Nuala's 2007 horror movie Malam jumat kliwon, directed under the alias Koya Pagayo and also written by Sofid, which in turn recalled the 1986 horror movie Malam jumat kliwon, directed by Sisworo Gautama Putra. None of the three films' plots are connected in any way, though the words jumat kliwon evoke the US Friday the 13th horror franchise that started in 1980.


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